Treatment

  • Oligospermia
  • Oligospermia, also oligozoospermia, refers to semen with a low concentration of sperm and is a common finding in male infertility. Often semen with a decreased sperm concentration may also show significant abnormalities in sperm morphology and motility (technically "oligoasthenoteratozoospermia"). There has been interest in replacing the descriptive terms used in semen analysis with more quantitative information.

  • Azoospermia
  • Azoospermia is the medical condition of a male not having any measurable level of sperm in his semen. It is associated with very low levels of fertility or even sterility, but many forms are amenable to medical treatment. In humans, azoospermia affects about 1% of the male population[1] and may be seen in up to 20% of male infertility situations.

  • Chronic UTI
  • A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a bacterial infection that affects part of the urinary tract. When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a simple cystitis (a bladder infection) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as pyelonephritis (a kidney infection). Symptoms from a lower urinary tract include painful urination and either frequent urination or urge to urinate (or both), while those of pyelonephritis include fever and flank pain in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI. In the elderly and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non specific. The main causal agent of both types is Escherichia coli, however other bacteria, viruses or fungi may rarely be the cause.

  • Venereal Diseases
  • Sexually transmitted infections (STI), also referred to as sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and venereal diseases (VD), are illnesses that have a significant probability of transmission between humans by means of human sexual behavior, including vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and anal sex. While in the past, these illnesses have mostly been referred to as STDs or VD, in recent years the term sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has been preferred, as it has a broader range of meaning; a person may be infected, and may potentially infect others, without having a disease. Some STIs can also be transmitted via the use of IV drug needles after its use by an infected person, as well as through childbirth or breastfeeding. Sexually transmitted infections have been well known for hundreds of years, and venereology is the branch of medicine that studies these diseases.

  • Loss of Libido
  • Libido (lə'biːdoʊ) refers to a person's sexual drive or desire for sexual activity. The desire for sex is an aspect of a person's sexuality, but varies enormously from one person to another, and it also varies depending on circumstances at a particular time. Sex drive has usually biological, psychological, and social components. Biologically, levels of hormones such as testosterone are believed to affect sex drive; social factors, such as work and family, also have an impact; as do internal psychological factors, like personality and stress. Sex drive may be affected by medical conditions, medications, lifestyle and relationship issues. A person who has extremely frequent or a suddenly increased sex drive may be experiencing hypersexuality, but there is no measure of what is a healthy level for sex. Asexual people may lack any sexual desires.

  • Premature Ejaculation
  • Premature ejaculation (PE) is a condition in which a man ejaculates earlier than he or his partner would like him to. Premature ejaculation is also known as rapid ejaculation, rapid climax, premature climax, or early ejaculation. Masters and Johnson defines PE as the condition in which a man ejaculates before his sex partner achieves orgasm, in more than fifty percent of their sexual encounters. The most common definition is that premature ejaculation occurs if the man ejaculates within two minutes of penetration;[1] however, a survey by Alfred Kinsey in the 1940s demonstrated that three quarters of men ejaculate within two minutes of penetration in over half of their sexual encounters.[2] Premature Ejaculation can be differentiated between two types. Primary, which is present from the time a male begins puberty, and Secondary which is acquired later in the man's life. Premature Ejaculation can be further divided between; Global Premature Ejaculation, which occurs with all partners and in all contexts and Situational Premature Ejaculation which occurs in certain situation or with specific partners.

  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED) is sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual performance.[1] A penile erection is the hydraulic effect of blood entering and being retained in sponge-like bodies within the penis. The process is often initiated as a result of sexual arousal, when signals are transmitted from the brain to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is indicated when an erection is difficult to produce. There are various circulatory causes, including alteration of the voltage-gated potassium channel, as in arsenic poisoning from drinking water.[2] The most important organic causes are cardiovascular disease and diabetes, neurological problems (for example, trauma from prostatectomy surgery), hormonal insufficiencies (hypogonadism) and drug side effects.

  • Nocturnal Emissions
  • A nocturnal emission or wet dream is a type of spontaneous orgasm, involving either ejaculation during sleep for a male, or lubrication of the vagina for a female.[1] Nocturnal emissions are most common during adolescence and early young adult years, but they may happen any time after puberty. It is possible to wake up during a wet dream, or to simply sleep through it.

  • Spermatorrhoea
  • “Hundred drops of sweat equals one drop of blood and hundred drops of blood equals one drop of semen” – this is one of the age-old beliefs about semen. The commonest sexual problem of men next to impotency is “spermatorrhoea”. Spermatorrhoea is medically meant an involuntary ejaculation/drooling of semen without any sexual event/thoughts. Likewise, seminuria/spermaturia is the discharge of semen in the urine. Normally, semen gets ejaculated in spurts only at the climax/culmination of the sexual act.

  • Sexual Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients
  • In Brief Erectile dysfunction is one of the most common complications of diabetes and also one of the most underdiagnosed. Providers need to understand the pathophysiology of this condition in their diabetic patients and make an effort to diagnose and treat it. By doing so, they will improve their patients' quality of life. Previous SectionNext Section
    Sexual dysfunction is a common, underappreciated complication of diabetes. Male sexual dysfunction among diabetic patients can include disorders of libido, ejaculatory problems, and erectile dysfunction (ED). All three forms of male dysfunction can cause significant bother for diabetic patients and can affect their quality of life. Despite this, health care providers often do not specifically ask their male diabetic patients about sexual function. This results in considerable underdiagnosis because patients are often reluctant or embarrassed to initiate discussion of these issues themselves. By not recognizing sexual dysfunction as a common organic sequel-lae of diabetes that should be addressed and treated, providers are missing an important opportunity to improve their patients' daily existence and quality of life.
    While all three forms of male sexual dysfunction can be found among diabetic men, this review will focus on the most common form, ED, because the literature is most mature in this area. Defined as the inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance, ED is highly prevalent in diabetic men1 and is almost always organic in its etiology. Given that many patients feel that their ED is “in their heads” and that “their provider will dismiss any sexual problems they might bring up,”2 it may be a relief for patients to learn that their ED is physical, related to their diabetes, and treatable. To this end, the goal of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, quality of life effect, and treatment of ED in men with type 2 diabetes.

  • Irregular Menses
  • If you are suffering with irregular periods, it clearly indicates that your menstrual cycle has lost its balance. Actually, most irregular periods are benign and don’t cause any complications for your health.

  • PCOD
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders. PCOS is a complex, heterogeneous disorder of uncertain etiology, but there is strong evidence that it can to a large degree be classified as a genetic disease.
    PCOS produces symptoms in approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age (12–45 years old). It is thought to be one of the leading causes of female subfertility[4][5][6] and the most frequent endocrine problem in women of reproductive age.
    The principal features are anovulation, resulting in irregular menstruation, amenorrhea, ovulation-related infertility, and polycystic ovaries; excessive amounts or effects of androgenic hormones, resulting in acne and hirsutism; and insulin resistance, often associated with obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and high cholesterol levels.[8] The symptoms and severity of the syndrome vary greatly among affected women.

  • Leucorrhoea
  • Leukorrhea (US) or leucorrhoea (Commonwealth) is a medical term that denotes a thick, whitish or yellowish vaginal discharge.[1] There are many causes of leukorrhea, the usual one being estrogen imbalance. The amount of discharge may increase due to vaginal infection or STDs, and also it may disappear and reappear from time to time, this discharge can keep occurring for years in which case it becomes more yellow and foul-smelling; it is usually a non-pathological symptom secondary to inflammatory conditions of vagina or cervix.
    Vaginal discharge is not abnormal, and causes of change in discharge include infection, malignancy, and hormonal changes. It sometimes occurs before a girl has her first period, and is considered a sign of puberty.

  • Ovarian Cyst / Fibroid
  • Gynecology is the study of female diseases, as opposed to obstetrics, which is the study of pregnancy and its related disorders. The three most common gynecological problems which may need surgery are uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts and heavy menstrual bleeding.
    The most common difficulty when a female is diagnosed with a pelvic growth or tumor is to differentiate a fibroid (myoma) from an ovarian cyst and vice versa.
    Fibroid and ovarian cysts are the two most common female pelvic growths that cause confusion for patients. Even the term ‘tumor’, which just means a growth and does not indicate whether it is benign (non-cancerous) or a cancer, can be confusing.
    A fibroid is commonly referred to as a “meat” or “muscle” tumor. This is because the growth arises from the smooth muscles of the uterus.
    Indonesians call it “myom”. Fibroids are common non-cancerous growths found in about 10 to 20 percent of women of reproductive age.

  • Gynaecological Disorders
  • Gynaecology or gynecology is the medical practice dealing with the health of the female reproductive system (uterus, vagina, and ovaries). Literally, outside medicine, it means "the science of women". Its counterpart is andrology, which deals with medical issues specific to the male reproductive system. Almost all modern gynaecologists are also obstetricians (see obstetrics and gynaecology). In many areas, the specialties of gynaecology and obstetrics overlap. Gynaecology has been considered to end at 28 weeks gestation, but practically there is no clear cut-off. Since 1st October 1992, this cut-off may be considered to occur at 24 weeks gestation in the United States, since the law and definition of abortion changed to bring it closer to the gestation at which a fetus becomes viable.

Oligospermia Azoospermia Chronic UTI loss-of-libido veranal pre_ejaculation Erectile-Dysfunction Spermatorrhoea diabetes Menstruation pcod Leucorrhoea ovarian-cyst-fertility pregnent